Wayfinding in Playable Cities

Troy Innocent, Swinburne University of Technology Part of CW17

Cities can be sites for self-discovery and transformation; they are also constantly in the process of becoming. Urban codemaking is a framework for decoding and reimagining cities, a programming language for urban space that marks locations in the city using codes enabling multiple alternate readings of that city – by machines, humans, and other entities.

This workshop will invite feedback on the current iteration of this system following a series of interventions into public space situated around experimental and playful approaches to wayfinding using urban codes.


Troy Innocent is an artist, academic, designer and educator whose hybrid practice traverses multiple disciplines. His public art practice incorporates pervasive game design, augmented reality, and urban design supporting a long-term investigation into interactive and speculative experiences of the city as an emergent process.

In 2017 Innocent was awarded the Melbourne Knowledge Fellowship to research and develop playable cities in the UK and Europe leading to a crossdisciplinary collaboration with urban designers, policy makers and creative facilitators to transform the city through play. This approach is also central to his public art practice through ‘urban codemaking’ – a system he developed for situating play in cities such as Melbourne, Istanbul, Sydney and Hong Kong.

Innocent teaches pervasive game design at Swinburne University; and is represented by Anna Pappas Gallery.


State of the AR

Iain Anderson, Training Brisbane Part of CW17

Apple’s new ARKit has launched to some fanfare with iOS 11, and some flashy demos are already available. But is Augmented Reality just another fad? In this presentation, gain a broad overview of what AR is, of what developers have done so far with AR in gaming, education and art, and what it’s likely to be used for next.

Attend if you’ve heard of AR but not really seen it in person, or if you’re on the hunt for how you could potentially use AR in your own classrooms.


Iain Anderson is a video editor, animator, designer, iOS and web developer and Apple Certified Trainer based in Brisbane, Australia. He has taught privately and in tertiary institutions, and has freelanced for Microsoft and the Queensland Government. Comfortable with anything from Quartz Composer to Second Life and Final Cut Pro to Adobe Creative Cloud, he has laid out books, booklets, brochures and business cards; retouched magazine covers and product packaging, shot and edited short films and corporate videos, and animated for HD broadcast shows, film festivals and for the web.

Today, Iain is a Lead Trainer (creating video training courses) for macProVideo.com, for whom he also regularly writes tutorial articles. An Apple Certified Trainer and Apple Consultant Network member, Iain is an active trainer and presenter, and runs the Brisbane InDesign User Group. Iain also maintains an active interest in the iOS App Store, where he has published several apps and eBooks, and a free complication for the Apple Watch, called “Roughly”. Contact Iain via trainingbrisbane.com or iain-anderson.com.


360° Photos and Videos – Fad or Future?

Iain Anderson, Training Brisbane Part of CW17

Today’s 360° photo and video techniques let you capture the whole world around you, and today’s VR goggles and smartphones let you see whatever part of the world you want to look at. This presentation will show you some basic techniques on how to capture and edit photos and videos in 360° formats, and how to distribute them to a wide audience. We’ll use cheap cameras and widely available software, and you can make your own call on whether this is the way of the future or another fad.


Iain Anderson is a video editor, animator, designer, iOS and web developer and Apple Certified Trainer based in Brisbane, Australia. He has taught privately and in tertiary institutions, and has freelanced for Microsoft and the Queensland Government. Comfortable with anything from Quartz Composer to Second Life and Final Cut Pro to Adobe Creative Cloud, he has laid out books, booklets, brochures and business cards; retouched magazine covers and product packaging, shot and edited short films and corporate videos, and animated for HD broadcast shows, film festivals and for the web.

Today, Iain is a Lead Trainer (creating video training courses) for macProVideo.com, for whom he also regularly writes tutorial articles. An Apple Certified Trainer and Apple Consultant Network member, Iain is an active trainer and presenter, and runs the Brisbane InDesign User Group. Iain also maintains an active interest in the iOS App Store, where he has published several apps and eBooks, and a free complication for the Apple Watch, called “Roughly”. Contact Iain via trainingbrisbane.com or iain-anderson.com.


Using Virtual Manipulative (VM) Apps to Build Basic Circuit-building Procedural and Conceptual Knowledge in Young Children

Garry Falloon, Macquarie University Part of CW17

The use of virtual manipulatives (VMs) has been relatively commonplace in mathematics education for many years, yet their use for science learning has been less frequent, and generally limited to virtual laboratories or simulations used to support specific investigations or experiments, or ‘make visible’ to students difficult to grasp or experience scientific phenomena. However, with the advent of low cost mobile devices and an array of science-focused apps, there is an opportunity to leverage the potential of VMs to introduce students to abstract and practical science ideas at a younger age. This presentation outlines stage 1 of a study undertaken with new entrant children (5 year olds) in New Zealand, where a range of VM apps were used to introduce simple electrical circuit-building procedures and electricity concepts. Stage 2 of the project investigated whether or not the children could transfer any knowledge developed using the VMs into practical circuit building tasks using real equipment.

The teaching component of the study followed a guided discovery approach that provided minimal initial teacher direction. ‘Can You?’ circuit-building challenges were used to introduce different circuit types and concepts, and engage the children in each of the five, 40-minute teaching and research sessions. Empirical data were collected using an iPad display recorder app, and analysed for evidence of procedure and concept knowledge-building related to circuit construction, the function of circuit components, and ‘what happens’ in a circuit (ie., current flow, resistance etc.).

This presentation will share outcomes from stage 1 of the study, that suggests VM apps may provide teachers with a useful resource to build basic electricity concepts in early years education. It will present and discuss illustrative data highlighting how the students used the VMs to build understanding of different circuit designs and components, and how current was controlled.

Keywords: electricity, virtual manipulatives, VMs, apps, concepts, circuits, young children


Garry is presently Professor of Digital Learning and the Fairfax Foundation Chair of Teacher Education at Macquarie University in Sydney, Australia

Past research activities include exploring the effect of app design on student learning pathways, technology-facilitated school-scientist partnerships, the use of synchronous virtual classrooms in supporting distance students, online learning environment design, and the design and use of digital learning objects for learning. Presently Garry is engaged in school-based research on 3D printing and Makerspaces, building computational thinking in the early years, and using apps for developing science procedural and conceptual understandings and communicating outcomes from science inquiries in the middle school.

He teaches in Macquarie University’s HDR and teacher education programs, and is engaged with the NSW Department of Education’s Hub Schools initiative.


Moving the Boundaries of Reality – Bringing Augmented Reality to a Theatre (or room, or street, or garden) Near You

Stephen Atherton, Bond University Part of CW17

In 2016 “Pokemon Go” not only grabbed the attention of the public and the press – it injected a new life into a mature yet quickly evolving technology. In June this year Apple’s ARkit was released and it has hit the reset buton by empowered developers to head in new directions and do so with a minimum of development effort.

This session will look at the evolution of AR by showing examples of work that has been done in multiple disciplines from various universities. A number of AR Apps will be demonstrated. The talk will review the literature and examine the efficacy of AR as a teaching tool.


Stephen Atherton is currently working with Bond University in Australia around technology enhanced learning. Prior to that he consulted in the educational technology space in Europe and Australasia based in his modest S.W. French HQ. His particular focus remains upon mobile learning and competency based education.

After a number of years at the University of Queensland, Stephen joined Apple Australia for the long haul (16 years) as the National Development Executive, Higher Education. In this role he engaged with the tertiary sector in Australia and New Zealand around collaborative research and teaching projects, consulting, and the professional development of tertiary education staff.

Stephen has never lost the focus on the educational impact of technology that he discovered in his original career as a classroom teacher. Despite his passion for technology he is often heard chanting his mantra (care of Prof Di Laurillard) “if you put technology first, learning comes second!”

He is a member of a number of educational computing associations in the U.K. and Australia.


CreateWorld Call for Participation

CreateWorld is our 3 day performance, presentation, and professional development event, specifically for academics, teachers and technical and staff who use Apple platforms in the digital arts disciplines.

CreateWorld 2017 will take place at the Queensland College of Art at Griffith University, South Bank, Brisbane from November 29 to December 1.

The conference features a wide range of academic and technical presenters from education and industry, and includes several keynotes, panel sessions, hypotheticals, hands-on technical workshops, and regular presentation sessions.

The organising committee has issued a call for participation and are seeking posters, papers, performances, exhibitions, workshops and presentation sessions. This year’s theme is Creativity on the Move, and we’re especially interested in explorations of augmented reality (AR) and teaching software development both for and on mobile devices.

Learn more »


Automation Sampler

Sal Soghoian Part of DW17

Join Sal Soghoian for a hands-on review of some interesting uses of macOS automation technologies, including a look at AppleScript and iWork, and an examination of workflow variables in Automator. The second half of the session will consist of a guided tutorial introduction to Omni Automation on both macOS and iOS. You’ll want to have your iPads handy, with the free trail version of OmniGraffle 3 for iOS installed. What can be better than spending a couple hours sharpening your automation skills? And, it’s fun!


Sal Soghoian is a user-automation expert, software developer, author and musician. Throughout his professional career, his belief that “The power of the computer should reside in the hands of the one using it.” has guided the focus and direction of Sal’s efforts to create and advance automation technologies that empower the user.

He served as the Product Manager of Automation Technologies for Apple Inc. from 1997 through 2016, advancing AppleScript, Automator, JavaScript for Automation (JXA), System Services, the Terminal, Apple Configurator, and the other macOS automation tools. During his tenure, Sal was integral in the creation of Automator, and he furthered the incorporation of user automation into Apple’s products by writing the scripting dictionaries for iWork, iPhoto, Aperture, and Photos, as well as writing the “Mastered for iTunes” automation tools.

Sal also designed and wrote the user-automation support in the Apple Configurator application, which uses macOS automation to manage iOS device deployment. The Apple Configurator automation implementation consists of a central AppleScriptObj-C library and a corresponding set of Automator actions, enabling iOS devices to be prepared, managed and refreshed automatically upon their attachment to a hosting macOS computer.

Prior to joining Apple, Sal worked as a scripting consultant, creating automation solutions for the publishing industry during the 1990s. He authored a popular script collection called Sal’s AppleScript Snippets, the ShadowCaster Quark XTension, two books, including AppleScript 1-2-3, and numerous magazine articles about automation. Sal is also recognized for his work as as a featured presenter/instructor for Quark, Thunder Lizard Productions, Apple, and the Seybold, MacTech, MacSysAdmin, and Macworld conferences.


There’s Never Been a More Exciting Time to Be a Developer

Jake MacMullin, Stripy Sock Part of DW17

Jake will reflect on the past decade of app development, looking at the technology trends that have led us to where we are today. He’ll speculate on what the future might hold and explain why there’s never been a more exciting time to be a developer.


Jake MacMullin has been developing software for Apple platforms for over 15 years. He’s worked on the BBC News website, the ABC’s iView apps and is one of the founders of Stripy Sock, creating tailor-made apps in Canberra.


Add Intelligence to Your Next App with Cloud Services

Mira Kim, ASBPart of DW17

Do you want to be able to talk to your app to book your next flight? Verify the user by face recognition? Now you can add artificial intelligence right in your app using Amazon AI services!

This session will introduce the three AI services from Amazon – natural language processing, text-to-speech and image recognition – and show how easy it is to integrate it in your own app. The cloud services model of on-demand resources and per-usage cost makes it accessible for developers to get started right away. Make your next app more intelligent with cloud services.


Mira is an experienced app developer on both iOS and Android platforms. She has a diverse set of skills from embedded systems to web development.

Mira is an active member of a local makerspace and maintains a keen interest in electronics and robotics. Mira is passionate about making technology more accessible and promoting diversity in the tech industry. She regularly attends tech meet ups, as well as speaking at conferences.


Building Games with Unity

Jon Manning, Secret LabPart of DW17

The Unity game engine is one of the most popular and powerful tools for game development, and in this workshop, we’ll go from nothing to building a complete game.

We’ll be working with the C# programming language, and building games designed for macOS (while also touching on design considerations for iOS as well.) We’ll also discuss best practices for working with Unity in the contexts of engineering, assets workflow, and collaboration.

By the end of workshop, you’ll be cranking out games left, right and centre, and exploring a hugely powerful toolset for interactive content.


Jon Manning is the co-founder of Secret Lab, an independent game development studio. He’s written a whole bunch of books for O’Reilly Media about iOS development and game development, and has a doctorate about jerks on the internet. He’s currently working on Button Squid, a top-down puzzler, and on the critically acclaimed adventure game Night in the Woods, which includes his interactive dialogue system Yarn Spinner. Jon can be found as @desplesda on Twitter.